What Can I Plant in the Spring in New Jersey?

Sweet Peas

c/o: John Byer

Even though the snow has just cleared, there are plenty of things that you can start planting in your garden in late March and early April. The temperatures will be warming up and the last frost will come soon enough, which is generally in the month of May for New Jersey residents. Let’s take a look at some of the vegetables that you can get started on before the last frost.

Peas – Peas are a favorite vegetable to plant, and people usually like to plant them right around St. Patrick’s Day. There are two types of peas to plant: climbing peas will require a trellis while bush-type peas are fine on their own.

Radishes – Radishes can be planted at the same time as you plant your peas. Radishes work well when planted next to carrots since they prevent clumping, and this allows for straight-growing carrots.

Spinach – Spinach needs soil that has been well cultivated. Spinach is best planted in the first few weeks of April, but you can start turning the soil in March. Once the spinach seeds are planted, make sure the seeds stay moist, as they can be rather sensitive. In about a month, there will be sprouts and you can then add to the soil.

Lettuce – The first week of April is the best time to plant lettuce. Plant the lettuce in a lightly shaded area and make sure the soil is loose and well fertilized. Like spinach, you need to be gentle with the lettuce seeds by adding a thin layer of soil. The lettuce also needs to be planted in well-fertilized soil.

Carrots – Carrots can be difficult to grow, but planting them next to radishes is helpful. In New Jersey, it’s best to plant carrots in mid-April, and the soil should be somewhat sandy. If it isn’t, mix some sand into the soil for better texture.

Beets – Beets are easy to plant in New Jersey and should be planted in the middle of April. They make great additions to any meal, and they taste better when they are matured before the hot summer months set in.

Reference: GardenBedsNJ.com

Blog sponsored by: Horizon Landscape